Dick Allen Stats

Dick Allen was born on Sunday, March 8, 1942, in Wampum, Pennsylvania. Allen was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 3, 1963, with the Philadelphia Phillies. His biographical data, year-by-year hitting stats, fielding stats, pitching stats (where applicable), career totals, uniform numbers, salary data and miscellaneous items-of-interest are presented by Baseball Almanac on this comprehensive Dick Allen baseball stats page.

"Now I know why they boo Richie all the time. When he hits a home run, there's no souvenir." - Willie Stargell (after Allen's home run cleared the left-center field roof of Philadelphia's Connie Mack Stadium) in Baseball Digest (January 1975, Page 36) [ Dick Allen Quotes ]
Dick Allen

Richie 'Dick' Allen Autograph on a 1964 Topps Baseball Card (#243 | <a href='../baseball_cards/baseball_cards_oneset.php?s=1964top01' title='1964 Topps Baseball Card Checklist'>Checklist</a>)
Richie 'Dick' Allen Autograph on a 1964 Topps Baseball Card (#243 | Checklist )

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Birth Name:
Richard Anthony Allen
Nickname:
Dick, Rich, Richie or Wampum
Born On:
03-08-1942  (Pisces)
Place of Birth Data Born In:
Wampum, Pennsylvania
Year of Death Data Died On:
Still Living ( 500 Oldest Living )
Place of Death Data Died In:
Still Living
Cemetery:
n/a
High School:
Wampum High School (Wampum, PA)
College:
None Attended
Batting Stances Chart Bats:
Right
Throwing Arms Chart Throws:
Right
Player Height Chart Height:
5-11
Player Weight Chart Weight:
190
First Game:
09-03-1963 (Age 21)
Last Game:
06-19-1977
Draft:
Not Applicable
Dick Allen

Dick Allen Pitching Stats

G GS GF W L PCT ERA CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB IBB SO WP HB BK HLD
- - Did Not Pitch - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
G GS GF W L PCT ERA CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB IBB SO WP HB BK HLD
Dick Allen

Dick Allen Hitting Stats

G AB R H 2B 3B HR GRSL RBI BB IBB SO SH SF HBP GIDP AVG OBP SLG
1963 21 Phillies 10 24 6 7 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 5 0 1 0 2 .292 .280 .458
1964 22 Phillies 162 632 125 201 38 13 29 0 91 67 13 138 6 3 0 8 .318 .382 .557
1965 23 Phillies 161 619 93 187 31 14 20 1 85 74 6 150 6 6 2 13 .302 .375 .494
1966 24 Phillies 141 524 112 166 25 10 40 0 110 68 13 136 0 4 3 9 .317 .396 .632
1967 25 Phillies 122 463 89 142 31 10 23 0 77 75 18 117 1 0 1 9 .307 .404 .566
1968 26 Phillies 152 521 87 137 17 9 33 2 90 74 15 161 2 7 1 7 .263 .352 .520
1969 27 Phillies 118 438 79 126 23 3 32 1 89 64 10 144 0 4 0 10 .288 .375 .573
1970 28 Cardinals 122 459 88 128 17 5 34 2 101 71 16 118 0 1 2 9 .279 .377 .560
1971 29 Dodgers 155 549 82 162 24 1 23 0 90 93 13 113 1 5 1 23 .295 .395 .468
1972 30 White Sox 148 506 90 156 28 5 37 0 113 99 16 126 0 3 1 13 .308 .420 .603
1973 31 White Sox 72 250 39 79 20 3 16 0 41 33 3 51 1 3 1 9 .316 .394 .612
1974 32 White Sox 128 462 84 139 23 1 32 1 88 57 9 89 0 5 1 16 .301 .375 .563
1975 33 Phillies 119 416 54 97 21 3 12 0 62 58 4 109 1 4 2 19 .233 .327 .385
1976 34 Phillies 85 298 52 80 16 1 15 1 49 37 2 63 1 3 0 13 .268 .346 .480
1977 35 Athletics 54 171 19 41 4 0 5 0 31 24 0 36 0 4 1 4 .240 .330 .351
G AB R H 2B 3B HR GRSL RBI BB IBB SO SH SF HBP GIDP AVG OBP SLG
15 Years 1,749 6,332 1,099 1,848 320 79 351 8 1,119 894 138 1,556 19 53 16 164 .292 .378 .534
Dick Allen

Dick Allen Fielding Stats

POS G GS OUTS TC TC/G CH PO A E DP PB CASB CACS FLD% RF
1963 Phillies 3B 1 0 3 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1963 Phillies LF 7 5 153 11 1.6 9 9 0 2 0 n/a n/a n/a .818 1.59
1964 Phillies 3B 162 162 4,257 520 3.2 479 154 325 41 30 n/a n/a n/a .921 3.04
1965 Phillies 3B 160 160 4,294 460 2.9 434 129 305 26 29 n/a n/a n/a .943 2.73
1965 Phillies SS 2 0 7 1 0.5 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 3.86
1966 Phillies 3B 91 91 2,419 270 3.0 261 81 180 9 15 n/a n/a n/a .967 2.91
1966 Phillies LF 47 46 1,122 74 1.6 69 67 2 5 0 n/a n/a n/a .932 1.66
1967 Phillies 2B 1 0 1 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1967 Phillies 3B 121 121 3,256 379 3.1 344 95 249 35 23 n/a n/a n/a .908 2.85
1967 Phillies SS 1 0 4 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1968 Phillies 3B 10 7 215 28 2.8 22 7 15 6 4 n/a n/a n/a .786 2.76
1968 Phillies CF 1 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1968 Phillies LF 139 136 3,536 214 1.5 208 203 5 6 2 n/a n/a n/a .972 1.59
1969 Phillies 1B 117 117 3,064 1,094 9.4 1,078 1,024 54 16 100 n/a n/a n/a .985 9.50
1970 Cardinals 1B 79 78 2,059 722 9.1 717 676 41 5 67 n/a n/a n/a .993 9.40
1970 Cardinals 3B 38 38 993 105 2.8 94 27 67 11 3 n/a n/a n/a .895 2.56
1970 Cardinals LF 3 3 84 8 2.7 6 5 1 2 0 n/a n/a n/a .750 1.93
1971 Dodgers 1B 28 28 702 273 9.8 271 258 13 2 26 n/a n/a n/a .993 10.42
1971 Dodgers 3B 67 65 1,685 184 2.7 169 36 133 15 12 n/a n/a n/a .918 2.71
1971 Dodgers LF 60 59 1,489 100 1.7 96 91 5 4 0 n/a n/a n/a .960 1.74
1972 White Sox 1B 143 139 3,604 1,308 9.1 1,301 1,234 67 7 94 n/a n/a n/a .995 9.75
1972 White Sox 3B 2 2 48 3 1.5 3 1 2 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 1.69
1973 White Sox 1B 67 67 1,662 644 9.6 640 597 43 4 55 n/a n/a n/a .994 10.40
1973 White Sox 2B 2 0 33 7 3.5 7 4 3 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 5.73
1974 White Sox 1B 125 121 3,009 1,062 8.5 1,047 998 49 15 112 n/a n/a n/a .986 9.39
1974 White Sox 2B 1 0 3 2 2.0 1 0 1 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .500 9.00
1975 Phillies 1B 113 112 2,756 988 8.7 970 900 70 18 79 n/a n/a n/a .982 9.50
1976 Phillies 1B 85 83 2,045 723 8.5 715 671 44 8 71 n/a n/a n/a .989 9.44
1977 Athletics 1B 50 50 1,161 433 8.7 426 389 37 7 36 n/a n/a n/a .984 9.91
POS G GS OUTS TC TC/G CH PO A E DP PB CASB CACS FLD% RF
1B Totals 807 795 20,062 7,247 9.0 7,165 6,747 418 82 640 n/a n/a n/a .989 9.64
3B Totals 652 646 17,170 1,949 3.0 1,806 530 1,276 143 116 n/a n/a n/a .927 2.84
LF Totals 256 249 6,384 407 1.6 388 375 13 19 2 n/a n/a n/a .953 1.64
2B Totals 4 0 37 9 2.3 8 4 4 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .889 5.84
SS Totals 3 0 11 1 0.3 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 2.45
CF Totals 1 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
15 Years 1,723 1,690 43,664 9,613 5.6 9,368 7,657 1,711 245 758 n/a n/a n/a .975 5.79
Dick Allen

Dick Allen Miscellaneous Stats

SB CS SB% PH PR DH AB/HR AB/K AB/RBI K/BB K/9 BB/9
1963 Phillies 0 0 .000 2 1 n/a 0.0 4.8 12.0 - - -
1964 Phillies 3 4 .429 0 0 n/a 21.8 4.6 6.9 - - -
1965 Phillies 15 2 .882 1 0 n/a 31.0 4.1 7.3 - - -
1966 Phillies 10 6 .625 4 0 n/a 13.1 3.9 4.8 - - -
1967 Phillies 20 5 .800 1 0 n/a 20.1 4.0 6.0 - - -
1968 Phillies 7 7 .500 9 0 n/a 15.8 3.2 5.8 - - -
1969 Phillies 9 3 .750 1 0 n/a 13.7 3.0 4.9 - - -
1970 Cardinals 5 4 .556 3 0 n/a 13.5 3.9 4.5 - - -
1971 Dodgers 8 1 .889 3 0 n/a 23.9 4.9 6.1 - - -
1972 White Sox 19 8 .704 7 0 n/a 13.7 4.0 4.5 - - -
1973 White Sox 7 2 .778 4 0 1 15.6 4.9 6.1 - - -
1974 White Sox 7 1 .875 6 0 1 14.4 5.2 5.3 - - -
1975 Phillies 11 2 .846 6 0 n/a 34.7 3.8 6.7 - - -
1976 Phillies 11 4 .733 2 0 n/a 19.9 4.7 6.1 - - -
1977 Athletics 1 3 .250 3 0 1 34.2 4.8 5.5 - - -
SB CS SB% PH PR DH AB/HR AB/K AB/RBI K/BB K/9 BB/9
15 Years 133 52 .719 52 1 3 18.0 4.1 5.7 - - -
Dick Allen

Dick Allen Miscellaneous Items of Interest

1963 Philadelphia Phillies 32 $12,250.00 - -
1964 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $15,000.00 - -
1965 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $20,000.00 Stats -
1966 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $45,300.00 Stats -
1967 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $50,000.00 Stats -
1968 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $65,000.00 - -
1969 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $70,000.00 - -
1970 St. Louis Cardinals 15 $85,000.00 Stats -
1971 Los Angeles Dodgers 15 $125,000.00 - -
1972 Chicago White Sox 15 $140,000.00 Stats -
1973 Chicago White Sox 15 $200,000.00 Stats -
1974 Chicago White Sox 15 $200,000.00 Stats -
1975 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $225,000.00 - -
1976 Philadelphia Phillies 15 $145,000.00 - -
1977 Oakland Athletics 60 $100,000.00 - -


Did you know that baseball historian Bill Jenkinson in The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs ranked Allen with Jimmie Foxx and Mickey Mantle , and just a notch below Babe Ruth , as the four top long distance sluggers ever to wield a baseball bat? A segment of MLB Network's Prime 9, aired February 7, 2011, concurred with Jenkinson's findings. On that same broadcast, Willie Mays stated that Allen hit a ball harder than any player he had ever seen. Dick Allen, like Babe Ruth , hit with a rather heavy bat. Allen's 40-ouncer bucked the Ted Williams -inspired trend of using a light bat for increased bat speed. Dick Allen combined massive strength and body torque to produce bat speed and drive the ball. Eighteen of his home runs actually cleared Connie Mack Stadium's 65-foot-high left field Grandstand! Twice Dick Allen cleared that park's 65-foot-high right center field scoreboard: a feat considered virtually impossible for a right-handed hitter. Allen hit perhaps his most memorable Philadelphia homerun off of the Cubs' Larry Jackson on May 29, 1965 , when he cleared Connie Mack Stadium's left center field roof Coke sign. That homerun, an estimated 529-footer, inspired Willie Stargell to say: "Now I know why they (the Phillies fans) boo Richie all the time. When he hits a home run, there's no souvenir."


Dick Allen Home Run | 1967 All-Star Game ( Box Score ) | MLB Advanced Media, L.P.
Dick Allen was a great hitter - seven times he was top three in slugging average (three times he led the league ), six seasons he hit at least .300, twice he was a home run champion , twice the runner-up. However, former player turned mega-scout Jack Ogden once said of him, "I scouted 90,000 players in my lifetime and Allen was the greatest I ever saw. It's too bad he had so many difficulties." Those difficulties covered every facet of the game, on the field, off the field, and Allen simply spoke his mind, combatted racism, and bucked organizational hierarchy:

Dick Allen, in July 1965, got into an infamous fistfight with fellow Phillie Frank Thomas . According to two teammates who witnessed the fight, Thomas swung a bat at Allen, hitting him in the shoulder. Johnny Callison said, " Thomas Pat Corrales confirmed that Thomas hit Allen with a bat and added that Thomas was a "bully" known for making racially divisive remarks. Allen and his teammates were not permitted to give their side of the story under threat of a heavy fine. The Phillies released Thomas the next day. That made the fans and local sports writers not only see Allen as costing a white player his job, but freed Thomas to give his version of the fight.

Dick Allen is known to tax law students as the petitioner in the famous case about his signing bonus, Allen v. Commissioner, 50 T.C. 466 (1968). After receiving a $70,000 bonus from the Philadelphia Phillies, he gave $40,000 to his mother. Allen attempted to avoid paying income tax on the $40,000. The court held he was both responsible for the taxes and not able to make a trade or business deduction for the amount.

Dick Allen was rated by baseball historian Bill James (The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, Free Press Publishers, 2001, Page 438) as the second-most controversial player in baseball history, behind Rogers Hornsby .

Dick Allen on Sports Illustrated
Dick Allen on Sports Illustrated (June 12, 1972 | Volume 36, Issue 24)
Sports Illustrated put Dick Allen on the cover in 1972 (image seen above) and he appears in more than 40 articles. Two insightful short articles appear below:

Dick Allen, Baseball Bad Boy (Sports Illustrated, Kelley King, July 19, 1999, Page 25)

One habit Dick Allen—the chain-smoking, hard-drinking, horseplaying, perpetually late bad boy of the 1960s—can't seem to break is baseball. At 57, long after a 15-year big league career during which he changed teams five times and retired twice, Allen is back as a roving minor league instructor with the Philadelphia Phillies, the team he signed with in 1960 and spent the next decade trying to escape. Of his new job with the Phillies, the Wampum, Pa., native laughs and, paraphrasing a state slogan, says, "I think I've finally found a friend in Pennsylvania."

Thirty years ago Dick Allen was not enamored of the City of Brotherly Love. His Edwardian suits and luxuriant Afro didn't fit in with white, working-class Phillies fans, and the press kept a tally of his every misstep. The fans booed him mercilessly, called him the n word (which upset him) and Richie (which infuriated him), and threw loose change and fried-chicken bones at him. Allen, who protested passively by wearing a batting helmet in the field, had learned early in his career, as the first black with the Phillies' Little Rock affiliate, that fans can also be your enemies.

The best weapon Allen had against his critics was a 42-ounce bat, with which he smacked Ruthian homers. In 1964 Allen won the National League Rookie of the Year and was called a sure bet for the Triple Crown by Philadelphia manager Gene Mauch . Allen came within 10 batting average points of that accomplishment with the White Sox in '72, when he hit .308 with 37 homers and 113 RBIs and won the American League MVP award. Since retiring in 1977 (with 351 home runs and a .292 average), Allen has dabbled in horse racing.

In his new position he is less a coach than a mentor to those Phillies farmhands who are still adjusting to the life of professional baseball. Says Allen, "I look at some of these young men and see myself. The thing is, young players on their way up are like children on a high chair: You must tell them to watch out because they have no idea what it's like to fall."

Crash, as the nonconformist came to be known, spends most of the off-season with his second wife, Willa, and his two grown sons, relaxing in the farmhouse he had built for his late mother with his $70,000 signing bonus. Family life allows him to watch over the career of a most promising young player: three-year-old Dickie Allen III, who, according to his grandpa, "swings the bat from side to side like you wouldn't believe. He might really amount to something." But, adds Allen, ever unhurried, "There's no rush."

What Ever Happened To...: Dick Allen (Sports Illustrated, Franz Lidz, July 19, 1993, Page 86)

The day begins brilliantly clear at Philadelphia Park racetrack, with a few soft clouds feathering the horizon along the backstretch. Dick Allen has come to the grandstand to bask in the sun like an old lion. "Racehorses and ballplayers," he says. "They're bought, they're sold, they're traded. Today in this barn; tomorrow in somebody else's."

Allen changed barns six times during a tumultuous 15-year career in which he batted .292 and hit 351 home runs. The blasts off his 42-ounce bat soared out of ballparks. "He could handle a high fastball," says Gene Mauch , his manager with the Phillies in the mid-'60s. "It was the fast highball that gave him trouble."

Fiercely independent, Allen used to show up for games hung over, smoke in the dugout and abandon his teams for days. "They called me a bad boy," he says, cackling. "But I was mild-mannered compared to players today. Maybe I was ahead of my time."

At 51, Allen has the look of a combat veteran who has been some places and done some things and come back feeling good about himself. "People said there was one set of rules for me and another for the rest of the team," he says. "When I was coming up, black players couldn't stay in the same hotel or eat in the same places as whites. Two sets of rules? Baseball set the tone."

Allen's memories of his playing days are tempered by a weary sadness that has replaced a more painful bitterness. In 1964, when he led Philadelphia to pennant contention, he was the National League Rookie of the Year ; in 1969 he was booed out of the City of Brotherly Love. "I guess Philly wasn't ready for an outspoken black athlete," he says. Pelted with coins, chicken bones and beer bottles, he took to wearing a batting helmet when he played first base.

After the Phillies traded him, Allen lasted one year each in St. Louis and Los Angeles before landing with the White Sox, with whom he flourished. In 1972 he batted .308, led the American League with 113 RBIs and 37 homers and won the MVP award. He retired five years later and became a semirecluse, training thoroughbreds at a Maryland stable owned by his brothers Hank and Ron. Now and then he turns up at racetracks to shoot the breeze, but he is noncommittal about how he makes his living these days. "I plunk around from here to there," he says. "I do all right."

Allen says he never considered returning to baseball until May 1991, when his 27-year-old daughter, Terri, was murdered. "She was born while I was playing ball, and that's what fed her," Allen says, whispering. "I thought maybe I should get back into the game, if only to get my mind into something solid."

He approached several teams about jobs. "Hitting instructor, scout, anything," he says. "They told me to send a resume. A resume! All they had to do was look on the back of one of my bubble gum cards.

"I still love baseball, I do," Allen says. "But once you're done with the game, the game is done with you."

Last-Modified: October 7, 2019 2:40 AM EST

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