Preston Gomez Stats

Preston Gomez was born on Friday, April 20, 1923, in Central Preston, Oriente, Cuba. Gomez was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 5, 1944, with the Washington Senators. His biographical data, year-by-year hitting stats, fielding stats, pitching stats (where applicable), career totals, uniform numbers, salary data and miscellaneous items-of-interest are presented by Baseball Almanac on this comprehensive Preston Gomez baseball stats page.

Baseball Almanac Top Quote

"I really wasn't ready (for the major league), and when all of the U.S. players returned at the end of the war, there were fewer opportunities. I was a good fielder with a strong arm, but I never learned how to hit until it was too late. I had a little power and made the mistake of thinking I had a lot of power." - Preston Gomez in the Los Angeles Times (Mike DiGiovanna, 01/14/2009)

Preston Gomez

Preston Gomez Autograph on a 1975 Topps Baseball Card (#487 | <a href='../baseball_cards/baseball_cards_oneset.php?s=1975top01' title='1975 Topps Baseball Card Checklist'>Checklist</a>)

Preston Gomez Autograph on a 1975 Topps Baseball Card (#487 | Checklist )

Career
All-Star
Wild Card
Division
LCS
World Series
Trades
Videos
Birth Name:
Pedro Gómez Martinez
Nickname:
Preston
Born On:
04-20-1923  (Aries)
Place of Birth Data Born In:
Central Preston, Oriente, Cuba
Year of Death Data Died On:
01-13-2009 ( 500 Oldest Living )
Place of Death Data Died In:
Fullerton, California
Cemetery:
Cremated
High School:
None Attended
College:
None Attended
Batting Stances Chart Bats:
Right
Throwing Arms Chart Throws:
Right
Player Height Chart Height:
5-11
Player Weight Chart Weight:
170
First Game:
05-05-1944 (Age 21)
Last Game:
08-12-1944
Draft:
Not Applicable

Preston Gomez

Preston Gomez Pitching Stats

- - Did Not Pitch - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Preston Gomez

Preston Gomez Hitting Stats

1944 21 Senators 8 7 2 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 .286 .286 .429
1 Year 8 7 2 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 .286 .286 .429

Preston Gomez

Preston Gomez Fielding Stats

1944 Senators 2B 2 0 14 1 0.5 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 1.93
1944 Senators SS 2 2 27 5 2.5 4 3 1 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .800 4.00
SS Totals 2 2 27 5 2.5 4 3 1 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .800 4.00
2B Totals 2 0 14 1 0.5 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 1.93
1 Year 4 2 41 6 1.5 5 4 1 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .833 3.29

Preston Gomez

Preston Gomez Miscellaneous Stats

1944 Senators 0 0 .000 0 4 n/a 0.0 1.8 3.5 - - -
1 Year 0 0 .000 0 4 n/a 0.0 1.8 3.5 - - -

Preston Gomez

Preston Gomez Miscellaneous Items of Interest

1944 Washington Senators 21 $2,750.00 - -
baseball almanac flat baseball

baseball almanac fast facts

Preston Gomez hung up his playing cleats after only eight big league games, then spent two decades coaching (and playing) in the minor leagues, and three additional decades coaching and managing in the major leagues. Preston Gomez trivia:

Preston Gomez was the third-base coach of the Los Angeles Dodgers when they won two National League pennants (1965 & 1966) and one World Series title ( 1965 ). When Dodger Vice President Buzzie Bavasi became president and part-owner of the expansion San Diego Padres , he made Preston Gomez the first manager in the team's Major League history [ San Diego Padres Managers ].

Preston Gomez, Media Guide
Preston Gomez | 1969 San Diego Padres Media Guide | Page 5
On March 26, 2008, after coaching in Spring Training games in Arizona, Preston Gomez was driving home and stopped to get gas in Blythe, California. While walking to his car, Preston was hit by a pickup truck, suffered from serious head injured, and passed away ten months later. The Press Release (San Diego Padres, 01/13/2009) read:

Padres, Cubs manager dead at 85

Preston Gomez, who managed the expansion San Diego Padres and later guided the Houston Astros and Chicago Cubs during a six-decade career in baseball, died Tuesday. He was 85.

Gomez died in Fullerton, California. He never fully recovered from head injuries sustained last March when he was hit by a pickup truck while walking to his car in Blythe, California.

Gomez worked for the Angels for more than 25 years, and was on his way back from the team's spring training camp in Tempe, Arizona, when he was struck. The Angels announced his death.

Before the accident, Gomez had been a fixture around the ballpark and had been in the Angels' organization since 1981, most recently as an assistant to the general manager. Angels manager Mike Scioscia annually invited Gomez to instruct in camp.

"Preston had an incredible passion for baseball and was a mentor for all of us who were fortunate to spend time with him," Scioscia said. "He will certainly be missed, but I know his presence will be felt every time we take the field because of the knowledge and wisdom that he imparted to us."

The Cuban-born Gomez played eight games in the major leagues. He played and managed in the minors and served as coach, manager and executive in the big leagues for decades.

Gomez was the third-base coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1965-68, a span when they won two NL pennants and a World Series title.

"The man spent his entire life in baseball," Hall of Fame Dodgers manager Tom Lasorda . "He came from Cuba and got the opportunity to work for the Dodgers.

"He managed three major league teams and was a credit to the game. We are very sorry to see him pass away. He wore the Dodger uniform with pride and dignity. He has helped a lot of people in our game and he will be missed."

Gomez managed seven years in the majors, going 346-529 in a span from 1969 to 1980. He never had a winning season, coming the closest at 81-81 in 1974 in the first of his two seasons with the Astros.

In his first three years as a big league manager, the expansion Padres finished in last place every season. It was a feat that wouldn't be repeated by a manager for 15 years.

Amid those forgettable seasons came some memorable moments:

On July 21, 1970 , Gomez pulled pitcher Clay Kirby for a pinch-hitter after eight no-hit innings against the Mets. To this day, the Padres haven't had a pitcher throw a no-hitter. And they lost that game 3-0.

Gomez was fired by the Padres just 11 games into the 1972 season, one of the earliest dismissals in major league history. But he would still find four more seasons of work as a manager, next relieving Leo Durocher in Houston.

Gomez was born Pedro W. Gomez Martinez on April 20, 1923, in Central Preston, Cuba.

At age 21 he played in eight games for the Washington Senators, going 2-for-7 with a double and two RBIs.

He spent a decade after that playing in the minor leagues, then spent another decade as a minor league manager, working in the systems of the Cincinnati Reds, the New York Yankees and the Dodgers.

Pitcher Billy Muffett , who played for Gomez for the Yankees' farm club in Richmond, Virginia, recalled an encounter with the manager after he had given up a couple of long home runs.

"Preston comes out to the mound and says, 'What did he hit?' I said, 'Preston, I believe it was a Rawlings,'" Muffett recalled in 1990.

"Well, he didn't think it was too funny. He said, 'Next time, throw fastballs' and walked back to the dugout."

Four years after becoming a Dodgers coach, Gomez moved to the Padres. He was hired by former Dodgers vice president Buzzie Bavasi, who had become president and part-owner of the newborn Padres. San Diego lost 110 games in Gomez's first season.

Gomez joined the Angels in 1981 as third-base coach and became a special assistant to the GM in 1985.

"The Angels family has lost one of its invaluable members, and one of baseball's truly great ambassadors," Angels general manager Tony Reagins said. "His influence and impact on so many throughout the industry is impossible to measure. Though he will be missed, Preston's legacy will forever remain a part of this organization."

Gomez was inducted into the Hispanic Baseball Heritage Museum Hall of Fame in 2003.

When Preston Gomez removed Clay Kirby from the no-hitter [ box ], his pitcher was losing. On September 4, 1974 , Gomez did the same thing to Don Wilson , who was losing his no-hit bid 2-1, and might have recorded his third career no hitter. The practice is not terribly un-common, but we look forward to your thoughts, please share them with us on Baseball Fever .

Last-Modified: April 2, 2020 6:25 AM EST

Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac29 Nov
RIP Bob Miller (😢). A Philadelphia Phillies (1949-1958) RHP. Member of Whiz Kids. He was the 15th oldest #MLB playe… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac29 Nov
#BaseballAlmanac #OTD 1969: Ted Sizemore won NL Rookie of the Year Award. DYK he was the seventh #Dodgers player in… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac29 Nov
Our Baseball Photo of the Day over on Instagram. I called it Admiration. I'd appreciate it if you'd give us a follo… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac28 Nov
Player of the Day: Sixto Lezcano. 1st player in #MLB #history with 2 career #OpeningDay grand slams, one in '78, on… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac27 Nov
Don Nottebart updated. RHP with #Braves, #Colt45s, #Astros, #Reds, #Yankees, #Cubs. Cemetery data changed. Rookie c… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac26 Nov
Thank you. I started #BaseballAlmanac [baseball-almanac.com] in 1999. I've preserved 515,000+ pages of #baseballtwitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac24 Nov
MLB and NBA? Here are two athletes that played both. Trivia Tuesday on Baseball Almanac: How many others can you re… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac23 Nov
Cat + baseball cap = Instagram. A story #BaseballAlmanac shared this weekend on our IG. [Follow Us:… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac23 Nov
Jonathan Papelbon has the most saves in #Boston #RedSox history AND the most saves in #Philadelphia #Phillies histo… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac23 Nov
In 1967, Eddie Stanky (MGR) offered Walt Williams (OF) a new suit if he could get 50 walks! On #BaseballAlmanac you… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac23 Nov
RIP Dan Pfister (😢). RHP with #KansasCity #Athletics (1961-64). I photoshopped out names of other #pitchers on his… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac20 Nov
Born #otd 1975, J.D. Drew is ONLY player in baseball history to twice (#Dodgers in 2006 / #RedSox in 2007) tie the… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac20 Nov
Yes sir - GREAT memory! I've attached the line score. If you want the full box score & write-up, the entire newspap… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac18 Nov
The 1962 #Mets lost 120 games during 1st season, including first 9 in-a-row. On April 23, they beat the 10-0… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac18 Nov
DYK George Witt's #Topps have his year of birth as '33, but they weren't "really" wrong, he lied about it! Source?… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac17 Nov
#OTD 1983 U.S. Magistrate J. Milton Sullivant ordered these three players to spend three months at the Fort Worth C… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac17 Nov
#Trivia #Tuesday by #BaseballAlmanac: Pictured are four number one #draft picks; however, none of them played #MLB.… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac17 Nov
RIP Lindy McDaniel (😥). RHP from 1955 to 1975! DYK he took the mound in almost #MLB 1,000 games? Go beyond his stat… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac17 Nov
Happy Birthday Ryan Braun (🎂). DYK his back-to-back 30-30 seasons were a feat only matched in NL by Willie Mays, Ro… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac17 Nov
DYK, #otd 1953, the #StLouis #Browns (L) officially became the Baltimore Baseball Club, Inc., or who we now call th… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Desktop Version