Richie Hebner Stats

Richie Hebner was born on Wednesday, November 26, 1947, in Boston, Massachusetts. Hebner was 20 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 23, 1968, with the Pittsburgh Pirates. His biographical data, year-by-year hitting stats, fielding stats, pitching stats (where applicable), career totals, uniform numbers, salary data and miscellaneous items-of-interest are presented by Baseball Almanac on this comprehensive Richie Hebner baseball stats page.

Baseball Almanac Top Quote

"Hockey is my kind of sport. You can get your feelings out on the ice. Baseball is you and the pitcher. Strike out and you gotta go back to the dugout and wait until the next time up. I can't stand those feelings inside me. That's the trouble with ball, there's no outlet in the game." - Richie Hebner in Baseball Digest (January 1980, "Baseball Frustrations", Page 11)

Richie Hebner

Richie

Richie "Gravedigger" Hebner Autograph on a 1981 Fleer Baseball Card (#474)

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Birth Name:
Richard Joseph Hebner
Nickname:
Richie or The Gravedigger
Born On:
11-26-1947  (Sagittarius)
Place of Birth Data Born In:
Boston, Massachusetts
Year of Death Data Died On:
Still Living ( 500 Oldest Living )
Place of Death Data Died In:
Still Living
Cemetery:
n/a
High School:
Norwood High School (Norwood, MA)
College:
None Attended
Batting Stances Chart Bats:
Left
Throwing Arms Chart Throws:
Right
Player Height Chart Height:
6-01
Player Weight Chart Weight:
197
First Game:
09-23-1968 (Age 20)
Last Game:
10-03-1985
Draft:
1966 : 1st Round (15th)

Richie Hebner

Richie Hebner Pitching Stats

- - Did Not Pitch - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Richie Hebner

Richie Hebner Hitting Stats

1968 21 Pirates 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000
1969 22 Pirates 129 459 72 138 23 4 8 0 47 53 10 53 9 3 8 7 .301 .380 .420
1970 23 Pirates 120 420 60 122 24 8 11 0 46 42 5 48 3 3 7 8 .290 .362 .464
1971 24 Pirates 112 388 50 105 17 8 17 0 67 32 1 68 5 6 3 6 .271 .326 .487
1972 25 Pirates 124 427 63 128 24 4 19 0 72 52 7 54 0 7 6 8 .300 .378 .508
1973 26 Pirates 144 509 73 138 28 1 25 0 74 56 12 60 3 4 4 8 .271 .346 .477
1974 27 Pirates 146 550 97 160 21 6 18 0 68 60 5 53 5 7 6 13 .291 .363 .449
1975 28 Pirates 128 472 65 116 16 4 15 0 57 43 6 48 3 5 10 7 .246 .319 .392
1976 29 Pirates 132 434 60 108 21 3 8 0 51 47 2 39 4 4 4 5 .249 .325 .366
1977 30 Phillies 118 397 67 113 17 4 18 1 62 61 8 46 1 4 3 7 .285 .381 .484
1978 31 Phillies 137 435 61 123 22 3 17 0 71 53 16 58 4 4 9 8 .283 .369 .464
1979 32 Mets 136 473 54 127 25 2 10 0 79 59 6 59 1 8 8 7 .268 .354 .393
1980 33 Tigers 104 341 48 99 10 7 12 1 82 38 3 45 2 5 2 7 .290 .360 .466
1981 34 Tigers 78 226 19 51 8 2 5 0 28 27 5 28 1 2 2 5 .226 .311 .345
1982 35 Tigers 68 179 25 49 6 0 8 0 18 25 2 21 0 1 0 1 .274 .361 .441
1982 35 Pirates 25 70 6 21 2 0 2 1 12 5 0 3 1 0 0 1 .300 .347 .414
1983 36 Pirates 78 162 23 43 4 1 5 1 26 17 4 28 2 4 1 3 .265 .332 .395
1984 37 Cubs 44 81 12 27 3 0 2 0 8 10 2 15 0 0 0 2 .333 .407 .444
1985 38 Cubs 83 120 10 26 2 0 3 0 22 7 1 15 0 0 1 2 .217 .266 .308
18 Years 1,908 6,144 865 1,694 273 57 203 4 890 687 95 741 44 67 74 105 .276 .352 .438

Richie Hebner

Richie Hebner Fielding Stats

1969 Pirates 1B 1 0 6 2 2.0 2 2 0 0 1 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 9.00
1969 Pirates 3B 124 120 3,120 338 2.7 319 79 240 19 31 n/a n/a n/a .944 2.76
1970 Pirates 3B 117 108 2,934 318 2.7 299 64 235 19 24 n/a n/a n/a .940 2.75
1971 Pirates 3B 108 93 2,616 275 2.5 261 89 172 14 21 n/a n/a n/a .949 2.69
1972 Pirates 3B 121 117 3,123 295 2.4 286 76 210 9 17 n/a n/a n/a .969 2.47
1973 Pirates 3B 139 137 3,624 375 2.7 352 92 260 23 19 n/a n/a n/a .939 2.62
1974 Pirates 3B 141 139 3,696 447 3.2 419 115 304 28 34 n/a n/a n/a .937 3.06
1975 Pirates 3B 126 124 3,252 349 2.8 330 86 244 19 17 n/a n/a n/a .946 2.74
1976 Pirates 3B 126 116 3,159 339 2.7 323 87 236 16 16 n/a n/a n/a .953 2.76
1977 Phillies 1B 103 100 2,505 1,001 9.7 992 927 65 9 91 n/a n/a n/a .991 10.69
1977 Phillies 2B 1 0 3 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1977 Phillies 3B 13 8 264 28 2.2 26 6 20 2 2 n/a n/a n/a .929 2.66
1978 Phillies 1B 117 103 2,721 1,042 8.9 1,036 987 49 6 86 n/a n/a n/a .994 10.28
1978 Phillies 2B 1 0 9 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1978 Phillies 3B 19 17 456 54 2.8 52 7 45 2 4 n/a n/a n/a .963 3.08
1979 Mets 1B 6 2 75 29 4.8 28 26 2 1 1 n/a n/a n/a .966 10.08
1979 Mets 3B 134 128 3,300 367 2.7 345 99 246 22 26 n/a n/a n/a .940 2.82
1980 Tigers 1B 61 57 1,377 502 8.2 501 466 35 1 35 n/a n/a n/a .998 9.82
1980 Tigers 3B 32 28 714 71 2.2 68 19 49 3 10 n/a n/a n/a .958 2.57
1981 Tigers 1B 61 55 1,401 563 9.2 560 531 29 3 36 n/a n/a n/a .995 10.79
1982 Tigers 1B 40 32 768 314 7.9 311 286 25 3 15 n/a n/a n/a .990 10.93
1982 Pirates 1B 4 2 87 28 7.0 28 27 1 0 1 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 8.69
1982 Pirates 3B 1 0 6 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1982 Pirates RF 21 18 357 27 1.3 26 25 1 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .963 1.97
1983 Pirates 1B 7 3 108 41 5.9 41 39 2 0 3 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 10.25
1983 Pirates 3B 40 28 840 61 1.5 59 16 43 2 1 n/a n/a n/a .967 1.90
1983 Pirates LF 2 0 3 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1983 Pirates RF 5 3 81 10 2.0 10 10 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 3.33
1984 Cubs 1B 3 3 87 37 12.3 37 35 2 0 4 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 11.48
1984 Cubs 3B 14 10 294 27 1.9 26 2 24 1 2 n/a n/a n/a .963 2.39
1984 Cubs LF 2 0 9 1 0.5 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 3.00
1984 Cubs RF 1 0 6 1 1.0 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 4.50
1985 Cubs 1B 12 9 282 115 9.6 114 108 6 1 15 n/a n/a n/a .991 10.91
1985 Cubs 3B 7 7 153 23 3.3 20 2 18 3 0 n/a n/a n/a .870 3.53
1985 Cubs LF 1 0 6 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
3B Totals 1,262 1,180 31,551 3,367 2.7 3,185 839 2,346 182 224 n/a n/a n/a .946 2.73
1B Totals 415 366 9,417 3,674 8.9 3,650 3,434 216 24 288 n/a n/a n/a .993 10.47
RF Totals 27 21 444 38 1.4 37 36 1 1 0 n/a n/a n/a .974 2.25
LF Totals 5 0 18 1 0.2 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 1.50
2B Totals 2 0 12 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
17 Years 1,711 1,567 41,442 7,080 4.1 6,873 4,310 2,563 207 512 n/a n/a n/a .971 4.48

Richie Hebner

Richie Hebner Miscellaneous Stats

1968 Pirates 0 0 .000 2 0 n/a 0.0 0.0 0.0 - - -
1969 Pirates 4 1 .800 8 1 n/a 57.4 8.7 9.8 - - -
1970 Pirates 2 3 .400 8 1 n/a 38.2 8.8 9.1 - - -
1971 Pirates 2 2 .500 10 2 n/a 22.8 5.7 5.8 - - -
1972 Pirates 0 0 .000 5 1 n/a 22.5 7.9 5.9 - - -
1973 Pirates 0 1 .000 7 0 n/a 20.4 8.5 6.9 - - -
1974 Pirates 0 3 .000 7 0 n/a 30.6 10.4 8.1 - - -
1975 Pirates 0 1 .000 4 0 n/a 31.5 9.8 8.3 - - -
1976 Pirates 1 3 .250 7 0 n/a 54.3 11.1 8.5 - - -
1977 Phillies 7 8 .467 10 0 n/a 22.1 8.6 6.4 - - -
1978 Phillies 4 7 .364 13 1 n/a 25.6 7.5 6.1 - - -
1979 Mets 3 1 .750 4 0 n/a 47.3 8.0 6.0 - - -
1980 Tigers 0 3 .000 16 0 5 28.4 7.6 4.2 - - -
1981 Tigers 1 2 .333 15 0 11 45.2 8.1 8.1 - - -
1982 Tigers 1 1 .500 17 0 20 22.4 8.5 9.9 - - -
1982 Pirates 4 0 1.000 3 0 n/a 35.0 23.3 5.8 - - -
1983 Pirates 8 3 .727 30 1 n/a 32.4 5.8 6.2 - - -
1984 Cubs 1 0 1.000 29 0 n/a 40.5 5.4 10.1 - - -
1985 Cubs 0 1 .000 65 1 n/a 40.0 8.0 5.5 - - -
18 Years 38 40 .487 260 8 36 30.3 8.3 6.9 - - -

Richie Hebner

Richie Hebner Miscellaneous Items of Interest

1968 Pittsburgh Pirates 20 Undetermined - -
1969 Pittsburgh Pirates 20 Undetermined - -
1970 Pittsburgh Pirates 20 Undetermined - -
1971 Pittsburgh Pirates 20 Undetermined - Stats
1972 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 Undetermined - -
1973 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 Undetermined - -
1974 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 Undetermined - -
1975 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 $62,000.00 - -
1976 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 $67,500.00 - -
1977 Philadelphia Phillies 18 $150,000.00 - -
1978 Philadelphia Phillies 18 $200,000.00 - -
1979 New York Mets 3 $200,000.00 - -
1980 Detroit Tigers 2 Undetermined - -
1981 Detroit Tigers 2 Undetermined - -
1982 Detroit Tigers 2 Undetermined - -
1982 Pittsburgh Pirates 10 Undetermined - -
1983 Pittsburgh Pirates 10 Undetermined - -
1984 Chicago Cubs 18 Undetermined - -
1985 Chicago Cubs 18 $310,000.00 - -
baseball almanac flat baseball

baseball almanac fast facts

Richie Hebner was a Major League baseball player, a professional baseball third baseman (who dabbled at first as well). He was also a batting coach / hitting coach in both the minor and major leagues. He was even a baseball team manager. But did you know his nickname, Gravedigger, was given to him because he was actually a gravedigger at a cemetery run by his father and brother? Baseball Almanac likes to take a look "beyond the stats" and we hope you enjoy the following historical baseball article about Richie "The Gravedigger" Hebner:

HOW MAY I HELP YOU?

Back when dinosaurs still roamed the earth, and the minimum salary for a major leaguer was a lot less than the current several hundred thousand dollars-a-year, most ballplayers needed to seek employment in the off-season to supplement their income. Young fans might find this hard to believe but as Casey Stengel once said, "You can look it up!"

Perhaps the most famous of these off-season jobs was that of Richie Hebner, who worked in the family cemetery as a grave digger. Even when salaries began to escalate in the 70s, Hebner kept digging those ditches for a few extra shekels. When Hebner was on the Phillies , a writer asked him if he still worked as a grave digger in the offseason. With a nod of the head and a solemn look on his face, the first baseman replied, "Don't close your eyes too long."

Other well-known players who punched a time clock from October until the start of spring training in February were Yankee stars Whitey Ford and Yogi Berra who sold men's clothes in a department store. Tiger great Al Kaline also worked in retail in a sporting goods store as a sales person.

Following Mark Fidrych's break-out 1976 season, one in which he posted a 19-9 record with a 2.34 era, " The Bird " pumped a lot of gas as an attendant at a service station in Massachussetts.

Imagine a " Rookie of the Year " doing that today in the off-season!

Long-time Red Ewell Blackwell sold cars, hurler Ted Wilks was a blue-collar guy in a power plant, and Detroit outfielder Davy Jones filled prescriptions as a pharmacist. Manager Hughie Jennings was a successful trial lawyer in the off-season. The highly-educated " Ee-Yah " could be quite a wit. Following an automobile accident in which he sustained serious arm, leg and skull injuries, he quipped:

"Life is full of trials, which is a good thing for lawyers."

The irascible Denny McLain couldn't stay out of the limelight in the off-season. Baseball's last 30-game winner worked as a lounge singer, accompanying himself on the organ, for several years in the late 60's and early 70s. Numerous people who saw McLain perform said that he was quite good as a crooner. It was at this time, however, that the troubled pitcher came in contact with underworld figures and other unsavory characters that eventually led to a suspension in 1970 and later, a stretch in prison.

There must have been something about playing for the Tigers that brought out the performer in a guy; McLain's Tiger teammate, Mickey Lolich worked one-off season as a lounge singer in Las Vegas. And in the 1920's, Earl Whitehill supplemented his income for a time as a professional musician. One of baseball's best-known pitchers at the time, Whitehill also made headlines when he married the lovely Violet Geisinger, the then-model for Sun Maid Raisins.

Several players played professional basketball in the off-season. Gene Conley had a six-year NBA career, garnering three championship rings as a member of the Red Auerbach's legendary Celtics. Ron Reed was a pro hoopster from 1965-67 and Dick Groat , a two-time basketball All-American at Duke, collected a hardwood paycheck following the 1952 baseball season. Outfielder Frankie Baumholtz and pitcher Steve Hamilton also helped pay the bills by playing a little round ball.

When Red Sox General Manager Joe Cronin found out that his talented young shortstop Johnny Pesky was risking catastrophic injury by playing ice hockey in the off-season, he sent a telegram saying, "Get off the ice and stay off!"

These are some of the more-notable examples of ballplayers and how they supplemented their incomes in the off-season. The lesser-lights also sought extra employment as grocery clerks, security guards, insurance salesmen, foundry workers, bus drivers, and a myriad of other occupations.

Those days are gone forever. With that era's demise, baseball lost something, an intimacy that can't be manufactured or branded by high-powered advertising.

The old-time players seemed more like us. It was easier to relate to a guy with a family making a combined 7,000 dollars-a-year as a ball player and junior high school basketball coach than the mega-millions stars of today. We appreciate the skill of the modern player and want as many of today's stars as possible on our favorite teams.

But do we love them like fans loved the old-time players?

Yesterday's players were people .

Today's major leaguers are a commodity , available to the highest bidder.

Yesterday was better.

Written exclusively for Baseball Almanac by historian / author Chris Williams.

Three Rivers Stadium Souvenir Book
Three Rivers Stadium | 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates Souvenir Book | Baseball Almanac Collection
Did you know that Richie "The Gravedigger" Hebner hit a historic single off Gary Nolan in the first inning of a game played on July 16, 1970 , the first hit, in the first Major League baseball game, in Three Rivers Stadium? The play-by-play for the first inning:

CINCINNATI REDS, 1ST INNING: Ty Cline grounded out (second to first). Bobby Tolan grounded out (second to first). Tony Perez struck out. 0 R, 0 H, 0 E, 0 LOB. Reds 0, Pirates 0.

PITTSBURGH PIRATES, 1ST INNING: Matty Alou grounded out (second to first). Richie Hebner singled to second. Gary Nolan threw a wild pitch [Hebner to second]. Roberto Clemente grounded out (pitcher to first). Al Oliver doubled to right [Hebner scored]. Willie Stargell struck out. 1 R, 2 H, 0 E, 1 LOB. Reds 0, Pirates 1.

Richie Hebner
Richie Hebner | Pirates Greats Playing Card | Baseball Almanac Collection
The Pittsburgh Pirates selected outfielder Wayne Dickerson in the first round of the first amateur draft, held in 1965 . Dickerson did not make it to the major leagues. The Pirates selected Richie Hebner in the first round of the second amateur draft, held in 1966 , making Grave Digger the Bucs ' first first-rounder to make it to the show.

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