Elmer Sexauer Stats

Elmer Sexauer was born on Friday, May 21, 1926, in St. Louis County, Missouri. Sexauer was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 6, 1948, with the Brooklyn Dodgers. His biographical data, year-by-year hitting stats, fielding stats, pitching stats (where applicable), career totals, uniform numbers, salary data and miscellaneous items-of-interest are presented by Baseball Almanac on this comprehensive Elmer Sexauer baseball stats page.

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Elmer Sexauer

Elmer Sexauer Autograph on a 1990 Target Dodgers Baseball Card (#1067 | <a href='../baseball_cards/baseball_cards_oneset.php?s=1990tar01' title='1990 Target Dodgers Baseball Card Checklist'>Checklist</a>)
Elmer Sexauer Autograph on a 1990 Target Dodgers Baseball Card (#1067 | Checklist )

Career
All-Star
Wild Card
Division
LCS
World Series
Awards
Videos
Birth Name:
Elmer George Sexauer
Nickname:
None
Born On:
05-21-1926  (Taurus)
Place of Birth Data Born In:
St. Louis County, Missouri
Year of Death Data Died On:
06-27-2011 ( 500 Oldest Living )
Place of Death Data Died In:
Atlanta, Georgia
Cemetery:
Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida
High School:
Undetermined
College:
Batting Stances Chart Bats:
Right
Throwing Arms Chart Throws:
Right
Player Height Chart Height:
6-04
Player Weight Chart Weight:
220
First Game:
09-06-1948 (Age 22)
Last Game:
09-12-1948
Draft:
Not Applicable
Elmer Sexauer

Elmer Sexauer Pitching Stats

G GS GF W L PCT ERA CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB IBB SO WP HB BK HLD
1948 22 Dodgers 2 0 1 0 0 .000 13.49 0 0 0 0.2 4 0 1 1 0 2 - 0 0 0 0 -
G GS GF W L PCT ERA CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB IBB SO WP HB BK HLD
1 Year 2 0 1 0 0 .000 13.49 0 0 0 0.2 4 0 1 1 0 2 - 0 0 0 0 -
Elmer Sexauer

Elmer Sexauer Hitting Stats

G AB R H 2B 3B HR GRSL RBI BB IBB SO SH SF HBP GIDP AVG OBP SLG
1948 22 Dodgers 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 .000 .000 .000
G AB R H 2B 3B HR GRSL RBI BB IBB SO SH SF HBP GIDP AVG OBP SLG
1 Year 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 .000 .000 .000
Elmer Sexauer

Elmer Sexauer Fielding Stats

POS G GS OUTS TC TC/G CH PO A E DP PB CASB CACS FLD% RF
1948 Dodgers P 2 0 2 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
POS G GS OUTS TC TC/G CH PO A E DP PB CASB CACS FLD% RF
P Totals 2 0 2 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1 Year 2 0 2 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
Elmer Sexauer

Elmer Sexauer Miscellaneous Stats

SB CS SB% PH PR DH AB/HR AB/K AB/RBI K/BB K/9 BB/9
1948 Dodgers 0 - - 0 0 n/a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 26.99
SB CS SB% PH PR DH AB/HR AB/K AB/RBI K/BB K/9 BB/9
1 Year 0 - - 0 0 n/a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.00 0.00 26.99
Elmer Sexauer

Elmer Sexauer Miscellaneous Items of Interest

1948 Brooklyn Dodgers 20 Undetermined - -


Elmer Sexauer, when he made his Major League debut on September 6, 1948 , played for one of the best teams in baseball history, but only lasted one week. Why? Baseball Almanac likes to take a look "beyond the stats" and we hope you enjoy the following superbly written article by Andrew Meacham , writing for the St. Petersburg Times :

Elmer Sexauer found his field of dreams, then lost it

A member of the 1948 Brooklyn Dodgers , the 22-year-old rookie shared a dugout with future Hall of Famers Roy Campanella , Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese .

He lasted a week.

After a career-ending shoulder injury, Mr. Sexauer sold food and raised a family. His wife stashed his newspaper clippings away, agreeing to his request for secrecy.

He encouraged a son to play catcher, and pitched to him easy. As far as Matt Sexauer knew, his father had played at Wake Forest University , then a little minor league ball.

Nothing more.

"He just wasn't the type to talk about himself or what he did or what he accomplished," said Matt Sexauer, 55, who went on to play college baseball himself. "Perhaps in his mind because he didn't stay longer, he wasn't the success that he wanted to be."

Mr. Sexauer, a country boy who briefly tasted the big leagues with the Boys of Summer, died June 27, of cardiac arrest. He was 85 and had been living in University Village for seven years.

His story is reminiscent of that of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham , who played a single game for the New York Giants in 1905 before beginning a career as a physician. Unlike Graham's character portrayed by Burt Lancaster in the 1989 movie Field of Dreams, Mr. Sexauer would not likely have described the experience as something "like coming this close to your dreams, and then watch them brush past you like a stranger in the crowd."

He simply filed the dream away and said nothing.

But for a while, his promise gleamed. Team scouts liked what they saw in the 6-foot-4, 220-pound right-hander. He was pitching for the Dodgers' minor league team in Danville, Ill., when they called him up in September 1948.

"He was one of those bright young hard-throwing pitchers in the Dodger organization," said former teammate and fellow pitcher Carl Erskine , reached by phone at his home in Anderson, Ind. "That whole organization had 800 players. Two hundred of them were pitchers, so to come out of that organization to the top was just amazing."

New York, with the Yankees, Giants and Dodgers all playing there, was the "biggest and brightest stage in those days," said Erskine , 84.

Fans routinely packed Ebbets Field in 1948, many to boo or cheer Robinson , who had broken baseball's color barrier a year earlier.

"Rookies didn't say much," Erskine said. "You've got to prove yourself and shut up."

Mr. Sexauer was trying to do just that, but was ejected his first game, an away game against the Boston Braves.

"It was his first day on the bench," said Erskine , who wrote about the incident in Carl Erskine's Tales from the Dodgers Dugout: Extra Innings. "He was green and young."

In a moment of levity, someone tossed a towel at the umpire. The ump demanded that the manager eject someone — anyone, he didn't care who. Manager Burt Shotton considered the order.

"He looks down the bench and sees Elmer. Says, 'You, kid,' " recalled Erskine . "Elmer was dumbfounded."

To exit, Mr. Sexauer had to cross the field to the opposite dugout under a shower of boos from the crowd.

But the same week, he got his chance to shine.

Mr. Sexauer pitched in two games. He gave up a run, walked two and recorded two outs. Then he hurt his shoulder.

He never took the mound again in a game.

"Doctors wouldn't touch an arm in those days with a scalpel," Erskine said. "They didn't know anything about it."

He finished out the season with the Dodgers, then was picked up by the Phillies. Then it was over.

Mr. Sexauer married Marilyn Mansfield, a physical education teacher. The family lived quietly in St. Louis and Indianapolis. He worked as a salesman for Sawyer Biscuit, and the Kraft and Dean food companies.

In the early 1970s, Erskine was attending a high school baseball camp when he heard a familiar last name: Sexauer.

"You don't hear too many people with that name," Erskine said. So he asked young Matt Sexauer if he was any relation to Elmer. Then he told the boy about his father's history with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Father and son chatted.

"He was kind of embarrassed," said Matt Sexauer, 55.

The secret out, Mr. Sexauer let his son look at the clippings he had stashed away all those years.

Now that his family knew about his playing days, he let others know, too.

Mr. Sexauer retired in 1988. Eventually, he and his wife settled in University Village, where Mr. Sexauer organized events for the men's club, scheduling field trips and guest lectures.

Even then he remained low-key about his shining moment.

"There are people who carry their professions like that's who they are," said Jim Petrone, 80, a neighbor at University Village. "They still like to be called doctor and professor and so on. Elmer never liked to be associated with being a professional baseball player."

Still, his son said, his father finally allowed himself to be proud.

"He had something that the rest of those retirees didn't," Matt Sexauer said. "I don't think he realized how special that was all these years."

You can follow the team links in the chart above to locate common statistics (singles), advanced statistics (WHIP Ratio & Isolated Power), and unique statistics (plate appearances & times on bases) not found on any other website.

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Last-Modified: April 27, 2018 11:43 AM EST

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