Bill White Stats

Bill White was born on Sunday, January 28, 1934, in Lakewood, Florida. White was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 7, 1956, with the New York Giants. His biographical data, year-by-year hitting stats, fielding stats, pitching stats (where applicable), career totals, uniform numbers, salary data and miscellaneous items-of-interest are presented by Baseball Almanac on this comprehensive Bill White baseball stats page.

"I don't want anyone telling me how much I owe baseball. Like Paul Richards saying that Henry Aaron would be running an elevator if not for baseball. What would Paul Richards be doing if not for baseball? And was has he ever done for baseball? I gave it 16 years of my life and never less than 100 percent on the field. So we're even." - Bill White in Baseball Digest (January 1969, Stan Hochman, 'Bill White Keeps His Promise', Page 39)
Bill White

Bill White Autograph on a 1990 Pacific Legends Baseball Card (#56 | <a href='../baseball_cards/baseball_cards_oneset.php?s=1990pac02' title='1990 Pacific Legends Baseball Card Checklist'>Checklist</a>)
Bill White Autograph on a 1990 Pacific Legends Baseball Card (#56 | Checklist )

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Birth Name:
William De Kova White
Nickname:
Bill
Born On:
01-28-1934  (Aquarius)
Place of Birth Data Born In:
Lakewood, Florida
Year of Death Data Died On:
Still Living ( 500 Oldest Living )
Place of Death Data Died In:
Still Living
Cemetery:
n/a
High School:
Harding High School (Warren, OH)
College:
Batting Stances Chart Bats:
Left
Throwing Arms Chart Throws:
Left
Player Height Chart Height:
6-00
Player Weight Chart Weight:
195
First Game:
05-07-1956 (Age 22)
Last Game:
09-22-1969
Draft:
Not Applicable / Signing Bonus = $2,500
Bill White

Bill White Pitching Stats

G GS GF W L PCT ERA CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB IBB SO WP HB BK HLD
- - Did Not Pitch - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
G GS GF W L PCT ERA CG SHO SV IP BFP H ER R HR BB IBB SO WP HB BK HLD
Bill White

Bill White Hitting Stats

G AB R H 2B 3B HR GRSL RBI BB IBB SO SH SF HBP GIDP AVG OBP SLG
1956 22 Giants 138 508 63 130 23 7 22 0 59 47 3 72 5 4 4 6 .256 .321 .459
1958 24 Giants 26 29 5 7 1 0 1 0 4 7 1 5 0 0 0 0 .241 .389 .379
1959 25 Cardinals 138 517 77 156 33 9 12 1 72 34 1 61 3 5 2 5 .302 .344 .470
1960 26 Cardinals 144 554 81 157 27 10 16 1 79 42 1 83 5 3 2 9 .283 .334 .455
1961 27 Cardinals 153 591 89 169 28 11 20 2 90 64 4 84 2 5 1 13 .286 .354 .472
1962 28 Cardinals 159 614 93 199 31 3 20 0 102 58 6 69 1 3 6 11 .324 .386 .482
1963 29 Cardinals 162 658 106 200 26 8 27 2 109 59 9 100 7 2 0 5 .304 .360 .491
1964 30 Cardinals 160 631 92 191 37 4 21 0 102 52 7 103 5 4 1 6 .303 .355 .474
1965 31 Cardinals 148 543 82 157 26 3 24 0 73 63 11 86 3 5 4 7 .289 .364 .481
1966 32 Phillies 159 577 85 159 23 6 22 1 103 68 12 109 6 5 3 6 .276 .352 .451
1967 33 Phillies 110 308 29 77 6 2 8 0 33 52 9 61 1 5 3 4 .250 .359 .360
1968 34 Phillies 127 385 34 92 16 2 9 0 40 39 6 79 1 4 2 7 .239 .309 .361
1969 35 Cardinals 49 57 7 12 1 0 0 0 4 11 0 15 0 0 0 3 .211 .338 .228
G AB R H 2B 3B HR GRSL RBI BB IBB SO SH SF HBP GIDP AVG OBP SLG
13 Years 1,673 5,972 843 1,706 278 65 202 7 870 596 70 927 39 45 28 82 .286 .351 .455
Bill White

Bill White Fielding Stats

POS G GS OUTS TC TC/G CH PO A E DP PB CASB CACS FLD% RF
1956 Giants 1B 138 138 408 1,382 10.0 1,367 1,256 111 15 106 n/a n/a n/a .989 90.46
1956 Giants LF 1 0 6 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1956 Giants RF 1 0 3 0 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a .000 0.00
1958 Giants 1B 3 2 51 18 6.0 18 17 1 0 2 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 9.53
1958 Giants LF 1 1 18 1 1.0 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 1.50
1958 Giants RF 1 1 24 1 1.0 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 1.13
1959 Cardinals 1B 71 40 1,215 431 6.1 429 404 25 2 32 n/a n/a n/a .995 9.53
1959 Cardinals CF 7 6 153 17 2.4 14 13 1 3 0 n/a n/a n/a .824 2.47
1959 Cardinals LF 87 84 2,010 169 1.9 165 164 1 4 1 n/a n/a n/a .976 2.22
1960 Cardinals 1B 123 112 3,039 1,070 8.7 1,059 994 65 11 109 n/a n/a n/a .990 9.41
1960 Cardinals CF 28 25 585 62 2.2 60 60 0 2 0 n/a n/a n/a .968 2.77
1960 Cardinals LF 3 3 69 1 0.3 1 1 0 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 0.39
1961 Cardinals 1B 151 149 435 1,494 9.9 1,477 1,373 104 17 125 n/a n/a n/a .989 91.68
1962 Cardinals 1B 146 132 3,567 1,324 9.1 1,315 1,221 94 9 114 n/a n/a n/a .993 9.95
1962 Cardinals LF 8 8 189 15 1.9 15 14 1 0 0 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 2.14
1962 Cardinals RF 19 17 378 27 1.4 26 24 2 1 2 n/a n/a n/a .963 1.86
1963 Cardinals 1B 162 162 483 1,507 9.3 1,494 1,389 105 13 126 n/a n/a n/a .991 83.52
1964 Cardinals 1B 160 159 474 1,620 10.1 1,614 1,513 101 6 125 n/a n/a n/a .996 91.94
1965 Cardinals 1B 144 141 3,837 1,428 9.9 1,417 1,308 109 11 114 n/a n/a n/a .992 9.97
1966 Phillies 1B 158 150 441 1,540 9.7 1,531 1,422 109 9 118 n/a n/a n/a .994 93.73
1967 Phillies 1B 95 90 2,304 833 8.8 827 775 52 6 85 n/a n/a n/a .993 9.69
1968 Phillies 1B 111 103 2,766 1,065 9.6 1,059 982 77 6 94 n/a n/a n/a .994 10.34
1969 Cardinals 1B 15 7 231 88 5.9 88 81 7 0 7 n/a n/a n/a 1.000 10.29
POS G GS OUTS TC TC/G CH PO A E DP PB CASB CACS FLD% RF
1B Totals 1,477 1,385 19,251 13,800 9.3 13,695 12,735 960 105 1,157 n/a n/a n/a .992 19.21
LF Totals 100 96 2,292 186 1.9 182 180 2 4 1 n/a n/a n/a .978 2.14
CF Totals 35 31 738 79 2.3 74 73 1 5 0 n/a n/a n/a .937 2.71
RF Totals 21 18 405 28 1.3 27 25 2 1 2 n/a n/a n/a .964 1.80
13 Years 1,633 1,530 22,686 14,093 8.6 13,978 13,013 965 115 1,160 n/a n/a n/a .992 16.64
Bill White

Bill White Miscellaneous Stats

SB CS SB% PH PR DH AB/HR AB/K AB/RBI K/BB K/9 BB/9
1956 Giants 15 8 .652 0 0 n/a 23.1 7.1 8.6 - - -
1958 Giants 1 0 1.000 21 0 n/a 29.0 5.8 7.3 - - -
1959 Cardinals 15 10 .600 5 2 n/a 43.1 8.5 7.2 - - -
1960 Cardinals 12 6 .667 3 1 n/a 34.6 6.7 7.0 - - -
1961 Cardinals 8 11 .421 4 0 n/a 29.6 7.0 6.6 - - -
1962 Cardinals 9 7 .563 1 0 n/a 30.7 8.9 6.0 - - -
1963 Cardinals 10 9 .526 0 0 n/a 24.4 6.6 6.0 - - -
1964 Cardinals 7 6 .538 0 0 n/a 30.0 6.1 6.2 - - -
1965 Cardinals 3 3 .500 6 0 n/a 22.6 6.3 7.4 - - -
1966 Phillies 16 6 .727 7 0 n/a 26.2 5.3 5.6 - - -
1967 Phillies 6 1 .857 18 0 n/a 38.5 5.0 9.3 - - -
1968 Phillies 0 1 .000 22 0 n/a 42.8 4.9 9.6 - - -
1969 Cardinals 1 0 1.000 36 0 n/a 0.0 3.8 14.3 - - -
SB CS SB% PH PR DH AB/HR AB/K AB/RBI K/BB K/9 BB/9
13 Years 103 68 .602 123 3 n/a 29.6 6.4 6.9 - - -
Bill White

Bill White Miscellaneous Items of Interest

1956 New York Giants 45 , 15 Undetermined - -
1958 San Francisco Giants 17 Undetermined - -
1959 St. Louis Cardinals 26 , 12 Undetermined Stats -
1960 St. Louis Cardinals 12 Undetermined Stats -
1961 St. Louis Cardinals 12 $20,000.00 Stats -
1962 St. Louis Cardinals 12 $25,000.00 - -
1963 St. Louis Cardinals 12 $30,000.00 Stats -
1964 St. Louis Cardinals 12 $40,000.00 Stats Stats
1965 St. Louis Cardinals 12 Undetermined - -
1966 Philadelphia Phillies 10 Undetermined - -
1967 Philadelphia Phillies 10 Undetermined - -
1968 Philadelphia Phillies 10 Undetermined - -
1969 St. Louis Cardinals 7 Undetermined - -


Did you know how Bill White played a part in baseball history on the field, in the broadcast booth, and in the front office? On April 12, 1960 , White hit a single to right field off of San Francisco Giants starter Sam Jones in Candelstick Park - the first base hit in that park. In 1971, White joined the New York Yankees as a broadcaster working 18 years alongside Phil Rizzuto and Frank Messer - the first African-American to do play-by-play regularly for a Major League team. From 1989 through 1994, White served as the president for the National League - the first African-American to hold such a high position in Major League baseball.

Bill White made his Major League debut on May 7, 1956 , and hit a home run off Ben Flowers in his first big league at-bat ( HR in 1st AB ). The smooth fielding lefty won seven consecutive Gold Gloves at first base and holds two fielding records, Fewest Double Plays in a Season at First Base by the League Leader (109 in 1960) and Most Unassisted Double Plays in a Season at First Base (8 in 1961). Thirteen years at first base, eight years an All-Star, and in his book ( Uppity: My Untold Story About The Games People Play ) White wrote, "..ushers would take me upstairs at the old Cardinals stadium, and they would give me a shot of Novocain and I played six or seven innings. The pain would come back, they'd take me upstairs again and give me another shot." Here is another excerpt from his revealing book:

Uppity

It was a hot, muggy night in the summer of 1954 when the team bus pulled into the gravel parking lot of a run- down burger joint just outside Wichita, Kansas. As usual, Dave Garcia, the team manager and part-time second baseman, got off the bus first to see if I could eat there.

My team, the Sioux City Soos, part of the New York Giants

Earlier in the season, when I had first joined the Soos, the entire twenty- man roster, me included, would have just walked into the restaurant and waited to see what happened. After all, we weren't in the Deep South, where blacks and whites were never allowed to eat together, where roadside restaurants that served black people, and only black people, were clearly marked with signs that said COLORED. We were in the Western League, with teams in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Colorado — but still, you never knew.

Sometimes they would serve us — or, more specifically, me — without a word, although I could usually count on getting some sideways glances from some of the white customers. Sometimes I could hear them say things like "Oh, they're serving them in here now?" — and everybody knew who the them was. Sometimes the restaurant manager would let us eat, but only in a separate back dining room where the other patrons couldn't see us. And sometimes they would flat-out refuse to serve us, at least not together, in which case the team would have to get up from the table and file back onto the bus and look for another place to eat. Finally Dave decided it was easier to ask first. More than half a century later, it's hard for some people, especially young people, even young black people, to believe that this happened in America, that the racism was so open and raw. But it was.

True, change was in the air. The Supreme Court had recently ruled on Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, which decided that "separate but equal" segregation in public schools was unconstitutional, setting the stage for numerous civil rights battles, not only in the South but across the country. The year after that, Rosa Parks would refuse to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama, prompting a bus boycott and introducing the nation to a man named Martin Luther King Jr. The civil rights movement was just starting to discover its own power.

In sports, meanwhile, it had been seven years since Jackie Robinson, with great courage and dignity, had broken the so-called color line in baseball, taking the field with the Brooklyn Dodgers as the first black man to play in the modern-day major leagues. Jackie had broken the color line, but he had not erased it on the playing field or in the hotels, restaurants, and spring training camps where Jim Crow still ruled. Baseball, America's pastime, could never be fully desegregated until all of America was desegregated — and that would be a long time coming.

Which is why in the summer of 1954 a young black ballplayer still had to wonder if some dingy roadside restaurant in Kansas would allow him to sit down and eat a hamburger.

When I saw Dave Garcia come out of the restaurant and climb back aboard the bus, I could see on his face what the answer had been. He was pissed.

Dave was a good guy, old enough at thirty- three to be kind of a big- brother figure for me. We were roommates on the road, at least in the non-segregated hotels, and we often hung out together. He understood some of what I was going through. While he was a native of East St. Louis, Illinois, Dave's mother and father had been born in northern Spain, and although ethnically he was the whitest of white guys, sometimes at road games people in the stands would see his name on the roster and call him a "greaser" or a "spic."

Dave looked at me and shook his head.

There was an awkward silence on the bus. My teammates were for the most part decent guys. They didn't like what was happening, but it was a long road ahead and they were hungry. It was 1954 and that was just the way it was.

I mumbled something like, "Go ahead, you guys. Don't worry about it." After a minute, they started to stand up and file off the bus. They didn't look at me. Dave said he'd get a hamburger and fries and a milk shake and bring it out to me. He followed the team into the restaurant, and I sat in the bus, alone.

It certainly wasn't the first, or the worst, indignity that I'd experienced in my young baseball career. The year before, my first season in the minors, I was playing first base for the Danville (Virginia) Leafs, a Class B affiliate of the Giants that was part of the Carolina League — only the second black player ever in the league, and at the time the only black player in that Deep South league.

In 1963, Bill White had a 200-hit, 100-run, 100-rbi season with the St. Louis Cardinals , only the third lefty in team history with that set of stats. The first? Hall of famer Johnny Mize in 1937. The second? Hall of Famer Stan Musial in 1946, 1948, 1949, 1951 and 1953.

Last-Modified: January 10, 2020 4:11 AM EST

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