Batting Champion Records

Batting Title Records Set by Batting Champions

Baseball Almanac is pleased to present a record book full of baseball records set by batting champions — including the youngest batting champion, oldest batting champion, most batting titles, and highest averages.

Important Note : Each of these records was set by the batting champion during the season that they won the batting title. NOT during their career, they must have won the batting title that specific year to be included below. An example: Mickey Mantle is listed with the highest batting average by a switch hitter, when he hit .353 in 1956 - the year he won the batting title. In 1957, Mantle hit .365, but since he lost the batting title to Ted Williams that year (.388), The Mick did not set the record for highest average a by a switch hitter that particular season.

"When I was a kid I always wanted to hit a baseball just like Rod Carew . He was my baseball idol." - Don Mattingly in Don Mattingly's Hitting Is Simple: The ABC's of Batting .300 ( Don Mattingly , 03/06/2007, St. Martin's Griffin, Preface)
Batting Champion Records

Major League Baseball Records Set by Batting Champions

Record
Lg
Name(s)

Team(s)

Data

First Batting Champion
(In Baseball History)

Philadelphia
.421
1901
Chicago
.429
1876
First Batting Champion
(In Consecutive Seasons)
Cleveland
.357
1903-1904
Cleveland
.382
Providence
.358
1878-1879
Providence
.357
Highest Average
(By a Batting Champion )

Philadelphia

.421
1901

Boston

.440
1894

Highest Average
(By a Lefthanded Batting Champion )

St. Louis

.420
1922

Baltimore

.424
1897

Highest Average
(By a Righthanded Batting Champion )

Philadelphia

.421
1901

Boston

.440
1894

Highest Average
(By a Switch Hitting Batting Champion )

New York

.353
1956

Atlanta

.364
2008

Most Batting Titles
(In A Career)

Detroit

12
1907

Detroit

1908

Detroit

1909

Detroit

1910

Detroit

1911

Detroit

1912

Detroit

1913

Detroit

1914

Detroit

1915

Detroit

1917

Detroit

1918

Detroit

1919

San Diego

8
1984

San Diego

1987

San Diego

1988

San Diego

1989

San Diego

1994

San Diego

1995

San Diego

1996

San Diego

1997

Pittsburgh

1900

Pittsburgh

1903

Pittsburgh

1904

Pittsburgh

1906

Pittsburgh

1907

Pittsburgh

1908

Pittsburgh

1909

Pittsburgh

1911

Most Batting Titles
(In a Career)
(Consecutively)

Detroit

9
1907-1915

St. Louis

6
1920-1925
Record
Lg
Name(s)

Team(s)

Data

Batting Title Records Set by Batting Champions



The youngest batting champion in Major League Baseball history was Al Kaline , who hit .340 in 1955, and won the American League batting title when he was only twenty years old. The previous record holder was Ty Cobb , when he won his first (of twelve) batting title in 1907, but The Georgia Peach was 20 years, 292 days old, versus Mr. Tiger , who was 20 years, 280 days old -- a twelve day difference!

The youngest batting champion in the National League is Pete Reiser , who hit .343 in 1941, when he was 22 years, 195 days old, beating out Arky Vaughn , who hit .385 in 1935, when he was 23 years, 204 days old.

The two oldest batting champions are Ted Williams , who won his last American League batting title in 1958, hitting .328 when he was 40 years, 29 days old. The National League record holder is Barry Bonds , who won his last batting title in 2004, hitting .362 when he was 40 years, 71 days old - the oldest by any batting champion in Major League history.

Did you know that Ted Williams won his first batting title in 1941, then his last batting title in 1958, a seventeen year span of time (with four additional batting titles between those two)? No American League player has ever had a greater span of time between their first and last batting titles . The National League player with that same "record" is Stan Musial , who won his first in 1943, his last in 1957, five more between those two, a "mere" fourteen year span of time!
Five rookies have won a batting title during their rookie season: Ross Barnes (.429 in 1876), Pete Browning (.378 in 1882), Abner Dalrymple (.354 in 1878), Tony Oliva (.323 in 1964) and Ichiro Suzuki (.350 in 2001).
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac8h
Carl Hubbell went 23-12 in '33, won MVP & signed a new contract OTD1934, a $6,000 raise. On #BaseballAlmanac, you c… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac16 Jan
TRIVIA TIME: He died OTD1965. He set the still-standing #MLB record for triples in a season by a rookie. [Answer:… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac16 Jan
OTD1974: The Baseball Writers' Association of America (@officialBBWAA) put Mickey Mantle & Whitey Ford in the Hall… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac16 Jan
Happy Birthday Brooks Conrad. Born OTD1980, he hit a walk-off super slam, making a little #MLB history, making a li… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac16 Jan
CURT FLOOD: OTD1970 he filed a $1 million lawsuit against Commish Kuhn & MLB, alleging violation of federal antitru… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac15 Jan
It's only "Haderade" days until Opening Day 2020! Number 71 has been worn 70 times, first by Johnny Hodapp in 1929.… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac15 Jan
NOT A TOPPS TYPO: Mike Marshall, born OTD1943, appeared in 106 games in 1974, setting NL / MLB record for most game… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac15 Jan
OTD1942: The President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, sent his "Green Light Letter" to the Commission… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac15 Jan
Baseball Movie Checklist: When "For The Love of the Game" was released, in 1999, we built this page, and we now hav… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac15 Jan
@expos_exposed You nailed it! The name stuck with him, and clearly inspired him to record the song later in his life.
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac14 Jan
#TuesdayTrivia: You know who that future #HOF pitcher is on the left (@ClaytonKersh22), but did you know Kersh face… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac14 Jan
OTD1928: Alfred James Reach passed away. His business, A.J. Reach Company, was once the largest manufacturer of spo… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac14 Jan
Happy Birthday to Terry Forster. DYK he once appeared on the David Letterman show AND he once recorded a novelty so… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac14 Jan
You are welcome Kyle, and if we can EVER make that piece of cake even better, please don't hesitate to let us know… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac13 Jan
Bob Forsch: Born OTD1950. DYK he was the first pitcher in MLB history to win a Silver Slugger Award? Read about his… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac12 Jan
Searching through OLD issues of The Boston Globe (@BostonGlobe) courtesy of Newspapers (@_newspapers) to find a sol… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac12 Jan
Why is Bill Madlock happy? Because today is his birthday! And, he won four batting titles. And, he once made a litt… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac11 Jan
UPDATED: Patsy Tebeau. Added GREAT quote about his perspective on the way baseball should be played. Then, I integr… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac11 Jan
@rip_mlb @baseball_ref I appreciate you tagging us. We were using the date from his actual death certificate, but I… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Baseball Almanac@BaseballAlmanac11 Jan
Ed Sprague. Went from playing softball in the Army, to the minors, to the Oakland Athletics - in three years! Read… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…
Desktop Version