Year In Review : 1876 National League

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General George Armstrong Custer was killed along with two-hundred sixty-four Union Calvary troopers after engaging the Sioux tribe at Little Big Horn. Not realizing the overwhelming numerical superiority of the Native Americans, the 7 th Calvary had made a crucial tactical error by dividing their forces into three separate divisions. A Civil War hero, Custer had fought at the first battle of Bull Run, distinguished himself in both the Peninsular campaign as well as Gettysburg and was selected as the Union officer to receive the Confederate flag of truce at Appomattox Courthouse.

I n the National League

The National League of Professional Baseball was formed with an eight-team circuit consisting of the Boston Red Stockings, Chicago White Stockings, Cincinnati Red Legs, Hartford Dark Blues, Louisville Grays, Philadelphia Athletics, Brooklyn Mutuals and St. Louis Browns. All owners agreed to play a seventy game schedule between April 22 and October 21.

In April, the Chicago White Stockings debuted the first shutout in baseball history with a 4-0 effort over the Louisville Grays. On May 25 th , the Philadelphia Athletics matched the Grays 2-2 for the first tie in Major League history.

The White Stockings went on to win the first National League pennant after defeating the Hartford Dark Blues by six games. They finished the season 52-14 followed by Hartford, St. Louis, Boston, Louisville, New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati.

"Everything is possible to him who dares." - Al Spalding
1876 National League Player Review

Hitting Statistics League Leaderboard

Base on Balls

Chicago

20

Batting Average

Chicago

.429

Doubles

Chicago

21

Hits

Chicago

138

Home Runs

Philadelphia

5

On Base Percentage

Chicago

.462

RBI

Chicago

60

Runs

Chicago

126

Slugging Average

Chicago

.590

Total Bases

Chicago

190

Triples

Chicago

14

1876 National League Pitcher Review

Pitching Statistics League Leaderboard

Complete Games

Louisville

66

ERA

St. Louis

1.23

Games

Louisville

68

Saves

Boston

5

Shutouts

St. Louis

16

Strikeouts

Louisville

122

Winning Percentage

Chicago

.797

Wins

Chicago

47

1876 National League

Team Standings

Chicago White Stockings

52 14 .788 0

St. Louis Brown Stockings

45 19 .703 6

Hartford Dark Blues

47 21 .691 6

Boston Red Caps

39 31 .557 15

Louisville Grays

30 36 .455 22

New York Mutuals

21 35 .375 26

Philadelphia Athletics

14 45 .237 34½

Cincinnati Red Stockings

9 56 .138 42½

1876 National League Team Review

Hitting Statistics League Leaderboard

Base on Balls

Chicago

70

Batting Average

Chicago

.337

Doubles

Chicago

131

Hits

Chicago

926

Home Runs

Boston

9

On Base Percentage

Chicago

.353

Runs

Chicago

624

Slugging Average

Chicago

.417

Triples

Philadelphia

35

1876 National League Team Review

Pitching Statistics League Leaderboard

Complete Games

Hartford

69

ERA

St. Louis

1.22

Fewest Hits Allowed

St. Louis

472

Fewest Home Runs Allowed

Hartford

2

Philadelphia

Fewest Walks Allowed

New York

24

Saves

Boston

7

Shutouts

St. Louis

16

Strikeouts

Louisville

125



On May 2, 1876, Ross Barnes of Chicago hit the first National League home run which was an inside the park variation. Cincinnati pitcher William "Cherokee" Fisher served up that historic pitch.

Did you know that on July 15, 1876, George Bradley of St. Louis pitched the first National League no-hitter against Hartford?

Are you curious about which player hit the first single, double or triple? How about the first pitcher to throw & win two complete games on the same day ? Scan through the 19th Century Era Famous Firsts to see these and learn even more about the first ever National League season.

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