Year In Review : 1951 American League

Off the field...

On May 12 th , the United States military detonated the first hydrogen bomb on an uninhabited testing island in the Pacific. The development of an A-bomb by the Russians had convinced the U.S. to proceed with development of the H-bomb version, which was several times more powerful than the atomic bombs dropped on both Hiroshima and Nagasaki to prompt the end of World War II.

Remington Rand Corporation debuted the first commercial digital computer, called the "UNIVAC" (Universal Automatic Computer). The first "UNIVAC" was sold to the United States Census Bureau to assist in the storage, compiling and managing of the U.S. population data. It weighed some 16,000 pounds, used 5,000 vacuum tubes, and could perform about 1,000 calculations per second. "UNIVAC" was also used to predict the 1952 presidential election. No one involved in the project actually believed its prediction (based on 1% vote in) that Eisenhower would sweep the election...he did.

The Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) introduced its first color television broadcast across five American cities for two and a half hours a day. However, due to the proprietary system used by CBS, more than 10½ million monochrome sets in the United States were blind to these telecasts. In response to the company forcing their own receivers on the consumer, the National Production Authority issued Order M-90 prohibiting the manufacturing of color sets for general public sale. Two years later, during a Congressional hearing on March 25, 1953, CBS announced that it had no plans to resume its own proprietary color system and the NPA lifted its ban on receiver manufacturing the following day.

In the American League...

During a March 26 exhibition game between the New York Yankees and the University of California, an up-and-coming nineteen year old rookie named Mickey Mantle hit a home run (estimated at six-hundred feet) out of U.S.C.'s Bovard Stadium. "The Mick" went on to finish the day with four hits and seven runs batted in (including two, two-run home runs and a bases-loaded triple) as the Major Leaguers prevailed 15-1. Mantle struggled at the plate over the next few months while striking out fifty-two times and was eventually sent back to the Minor League team in Kansas City.

St. Louis owner Bill Veeck had everyone in stitches after substituting a midget to pinch-hit during the first inning in game two of a doubleheader. Eddie Gaedel, a three-foot, seven inch dwarf, emerged from a cake wearing the number 1/8 during pre-game festivities, then took the plate for center fielder Frank Saucer and walked on four balls. The Detroit Tigers had the last laugh however after posting a 6-2 victory over the comedic Browns.

In the National League...

Howie Pollet finally ended the New York Giants sixteen-game winning streak with a clutch three hitter for a 2-0 Pittsburgh Pirates victory. The sixteen games (lasting from August 12 th to 28 th ) represented the longest winning streak in National League history since 1935.

On September 13 th , the St. Louis Cardinals became the first team since 1883 to play a doubleheader against two different teams on the same day. First they went up against the New York Giants (for a rescheduled rain game) and lost 4-6, then they fell 0-2 to the Boston Braves in their regularly scheduled night game.

The New York Giants literally snatched the National League pennant from the clutches of their rivals, the Brooklyn Dodgers, after Bobby Thomson hit the infamous "shot heard 'round the world". It was a perfect ending to a career season in which Thomson hit .293 with thirty-two home runs and one-hundred one RBIs.

Around the League...

National League president Ford Frick was elected to a seven-year term as Major League Baseball's third commissioner. Frick, who had held the top office of the National League since 1934, also made a name for himself as a respected sports journalist and as Babe Ruth's "ghost" writer.

TOPPS debuted its first baseball cards (a five set series) that featured such favorites as Yogi Berra, Bob Feller, Ralph Kiner, Phil Rizzuto, Enos Slaughter, Duke Snider and Warren Spahn.

A resolution was put forth by the South Carolina House to reinstate "Shoeless" Joe Jackson, who had been banished from baseball because of his part in the 1919 "Black Sox Scandal". Jackson was one of eight players convicted of throwing the Series (five games to three) in favor of the underdog Cincinnati Reds. After a lengthy investigation in 1920, members of Chicago's tainted team were amazingly acquitted the following year despite their own confessions (which were recanted later). All of the players involved were banned from baseball because of their undeniable link to gamblers. Jackson himself had batted a Series-leading .375 but later acknowledged that he had let up in key situations.

On April 18 th , as part of a pre-game publicity stunt, golf legend Sam Snead teed off from home plate at Wrigley Field and bounced a golf ball off of the center field scoreboard. He was the first player ever to reach the structure and the Chicago Cubs followed suite with an 8-3 win over the visiting Cincinnati Reds.

Baseball Almanac Top Quote

"I feel his (Eddie Gaedel) participation in an American League championship game comes under the heading of conduct detrimental to baseball." - American League President Will Harridge

1951 American League Player Review

Hitting Statistics League Leaderboard

Base on Balls
Boston
144
Batting Average
Philadelphia
.344
Doubles
Detroit
36
Washington
Hits
Detroit
191
Home Runs
Chicago
33
Philadelphia
On Base Percentage
Boston
.464
RBI
Chicago
129
Philadelphia
Runs
Boston
113
Slugging Average
Boston
.556
Stolen Bases
Cleveland
31
Chicago
Total Bases
Boston
295
Triples
Cleveland
14
Chicago

1951 American League Pitcher Review

Pitching Statistics League Leaderboard

Complete Games
St. Louis
24
ERA
Detroit
2.78
Chicago
Games
Boston
63
Saves
Boston
14
Shutouts
New York
7
Strikeouts
New York
164
Winning Percentage
Cleveland
.733
Wins
Cleveland
22

1951 American League

Team Standings

New York Yankees 98 56 .636 0
Cleveland Indians 93 61 .604 5
Boston Red Sox 87 67 .565 11
Chicago White Sox 81 73 .526 17
Detroit Tigers 73 81 .474 25
Philadelphia Athletics 70 84 .455 28
Washington Senators 62 92 .403 36
St. Louis Browns 52 102 .338 46

1951 American League Team Review

Hitting Statistics League Leaderboard

Base on Balls
Boston
756
Batting Average
Chicago
.270
Doubles
Philadelphia
262
Hits
Chicago
1,453
Home Runs
Cleveland
140
New York
On Base Percentage
Boston
.358
Runs
Boston
804
Slugging Average
New York
.408
Stolen Bases
Chicago
99
Triples
Chicago
64

1951 American League Team Review

Pitching Statistics League Leaderboard

Complete Games
Cleveland
76
ERA
Cleveland
3.39
Fewest Hits Allowed
Cleveland
1,287
Fewest Home Runs Allowed
Cleveland
85
Fewest Walks Allowed
Chicago
549
Saves
Boston
24
Shutouts
New York
24
Strikeouts
New York
664
baseball almanac flat baseball

baseball almanac fast facts

Perseverance? On April 17, 1951, slugger Mickey Mantle made his Major League debut and went 1-for-4 versus the Boston Red Sox. On May 1, 1951, Mantle hit his first Major League home run against Randy Gumpert of the Chicago White Sox. However, by the 15th of July, young Mantle had been struck out fifty-two times and was sent to Kansas City - a Triple-A Yankee affiliate.

The "unwritten rules of baseball" state that nobody should talk about a no-hitter while its in progress. On July 12, 1951, Allie Reynolds of the New York Yankees was not concerned with the unwritten rules and after the seventh inning walked into the dugout and asked Ed Lopat , "Hey pal, do you think I can pitch a no-hitter?" Lopat simply nodded and Reynolds then retired the last six batters in row for his first career no-hit game .

On August 19, 1951 , St. Louis Browns' owner Bill Veeck announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, as a special birthday present to our manager Zack Taylor , the management is presenting him with a brand new Brownie." Three foot seven inch Eddie Gaedel came to the plate during the first inning and received a bases on balls in front of approximately 18,000 fans.

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